Edible Flowers

Donaldson Greenhouses and Nursery

Profile and photos by Alison Hein

Three Donaldson brothers operate independent businesses on an expansive, well-tended acreage in Hackettstown. Brother Gary handles the wholesale aspect, Greg runs the farmers market, and David operates the Donaldson Greenhouse and Nursery.

Denise with lavendar

“We offer a product range from tomatoes to trees,” says Denise Stevenson, Retail Sales and Marketing Manager for Donaldson’s Greenhouses. Stevenson has seen Donaldson’s grow from a tiny establishment with one manual register to a modern, high-tech operation during her 16-year tenure.

The impeccably arranged greenhouses and lush outdoor garden area resemble a well-manicured park. “I’m crazy about plants,” adds Stevenson, who enjoys sharing her knowledge and assisting customers with their selections. “We grow our own vegetables, and plant our own annuals and baskets. We have a lot to offer in every season. During September, we plant 10,000 mums out in the field. It’s glorious.”

When asked about her experience with edible flowers, Stevenson says: “I have two passions – plants and cooking. My sister is a trained chef and we enjoy cooking together. We started with zucchini blossoms from our own garden – picking them, preparing them, cleaning them, stuffing them, and of course the best part, eating them. From there we moved on to candied flowers – using violas and roses as garnish in fruit salads and cupcakes.”

Stevenson cautions against eating unknown blooms, and recommends flowers grown without pesticides for culinary purposes. “That being said,” she adds, “the possibilities are grand. Some fruit blossoms are edible and tasty. Herb flowers, often overlooked, are also wonderful. I love using garlic flowers and garlic scapes (the long, green stems of fresh garlic) for a chive-like flavor.”

“Today I chose to share a recipe close to my heart,” says Stevenson. “I’m inspired by Maureen Gubelmann, chef and co-owner of Stella G’s in Hackettstown, who’s famous around these parts for her lavender lemonade. It’s refreshing and delicious - absolutely outstanding.”

Lavender Lemonade

Denise Stevenson is enamored of the Lavender Lemonade served at Stella G’s in Hackettstown, so she started making her own version, adapted from a Martha Stewart recipe. Stevenson recommends English Lavender for its intense flavor. For special garden parties or afternoon teas, Stevenson suggests freezing tiny sprigs of lavender in ice cube trays, then adding the decorative ice cubes to the Lavender Lemonade.

Ingredients

For the syrup:

  • 2 cups sugar
  • 2 cups water
  • ½ cup fresh (or ¼ cup dried) English lavender blossoms, cleaned and trimmed
  • 1 lemon, sliced thin
  • For the lemonade:
  • 1 cup fresh lemon juice (about 8 lemons)

  • 4 cups water
  • 2 lemons, sliced thin and pitted
  • Fresh English lavender sprigs, for garnish

Preparation

To make syrup, pour sugar into a small heavy saucepan. Stir in water and mix well. Place over medium-high to high heat and bring to a boil, stirring frequently. Turn down heat, and simmer for 2 to 3 minutes until sauce is thickened. Remove from heat. Add lavender blossoms and lemon slices. Cover, and let steep overnight (at least 12 hours).

Strain syrup, and pour into a large glass pitcher filled with ice. Add fresh lemon juice, water and lemon slices. Garnish with fresh lavender sprigs. Makes about 2 quarts of lemonade.

Donaldson Greenhouse and Nursery
178 Airport Rd, Hackettstown • 908/852-7314


Educate yourself about edible plants before ingesting any flowers.

  • Consume only plants that are pesticide free – plants that are raised to be edible or that you have grown yourself.
  • Introduce flowers into your diet slowly, and do not eat flowers if you have plant allergies.
  • NEVER eat a plant that you are not sure of – some wild edible flowers closely resemble similar plants that can be toxic.

Nearby accommodations and attractions

  • Wild Ridge Plants
  • Nursery propagated native plants available wholesale or retail by appointment. Our plants are chemical-free and local provenance. Consulting and growing services, presentations, guided walks.

    , Pohatcong, 908/319-7230

  • Lakota Wolf Preserve
  • Come for the photo opportunities of a lifetime and the chance to watch and listen to packs of Tundra, Timber, and Arctic wolves near the Delaware Water Gap. Bobcats and foxes also reside at the preserve. Wolfwatches and guided photography or video sessions around each individual wolf compound.

    89 Mt Pleasant Rd, Columbia 07832, 1-877-SEEWOLF

  • Inn at Millrace Pond
  • Located just one mile south of I-80, the inn includes comfortable guest rooms, wireless internet, exciting contemporary dining and intimate Fireside Tavern in a restored 1769 stone gristmill. An on-site meeting house provides a unique campus setting without distraction.

    319 Hope Johnsonburg Rd. (Rt. 519), Hope 07844, 908/459-4884

  • Pohatcong Native Arboretum
  • Local roots!

    56 Mine Hill Rd, Washington

  • Brook Hollow Farm
  • PYO apples, several varieties including semi-dwarf trees (great for kids). Peaches from our orchards, pumpkins, farm market. Wagon rides on fall weekends. Near the beautiful Delaware Water Gap, Rt 80 ex 4 to Rt 94 N, 3 1/2 mi to Frog Pond Rd. You?ll be glad you found us!

    Frog Pond Rd., Columbia 07832, 908/496-4577

More...

Comments

No comments yet
*Name:
Email:
Notify me about new comments on this page
Hide my email
*Text:
 
 
Powered by Scriptsmill Comments Script